Thu06222017

Last updateTue, 13 Jun 2017 9am

Time to hit and hurt the Pakistan Army!

Time to hit and hurt the

The Pakistan-sponsored fidayeen attack on an army camp in Uri on September 18, that resulted in the martyrdom of 17 soldiers, is the worst since 2002. Though all four fidayeenwere killed, that is cold comfort for an army at the receiving end.

Such large-scale casualties must not go unpunished.

Clearly, India’s carefully calibrated strategy to fight Pakistan’s proxies within its own borders and on its own side of the LoC, in order to keep the level and the intensity of conflict low and maintain a stable environment for rapid economic growth, has not yielded the desired dividends.

The increasing attempts at infiltration across the LoC and the spurt in encounters with terrorists in the Kashmir valley recently show that Pakistan’s proxy war against India is continuing unabated.

In order to reduce casualties and damage to property, India’s response needs to be reviewed and upgraded to a more pro-active one that raises Pakistan’s cost for waging a proxy war.

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Cauvery On Fire: Only Way To Douse It Is By Revisiting The Basis Of Past Accords

Cauvery On Fire

The Cauvery dispute cannot be solved by adopting a static approach, based on past legal decisions, or a fixed formula for divvying up the available water.

The focus has to be on augmenting water, and generating a bigger splash for available water though more efficient utilisation of every drop.

Politicians don’t usually seek solutions to problems; they try to see how they can benefit from them by polarising voters. This, unfortunately, is the case with the sharing of Cauvery waters, a problem that is nowhere near solution despite festering for over 125 years. Neither Tamil Nadu nor Karnataka did much to prevent the violence against Kannadiga and Tamil properties or avoid the inconvenience caused to innocents caught in-between. The situation in Karnataka has been worse, with several days lost to bandhs, and property worth crores (especially buses) destroyed.

What this shows is an abysmal lack of political foresight and leadership, with both states allowing the situation to go out of control by letting mobs take over the streets and threatening ordinary people trying to go about their daily work. That there was a bit less violence on the Tamil Nadu side does not mean that state handled the emotions of mobs any better. It was just more fortunate.

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Balochistan issues and International Law

Balochistan issues and International Law

Oppenheim defines ‘intervention’ as “dictatorial interference by a State in the affairs of another State for the purpose of maintaining or altering the actual condition of things”. The United Nation’s Charter under Article- 2(4) establishes the ‘principle of non interference’. This ‘principle’ draws its strength from the basic tenet of equality and sovereignty of the member States within the UN framework. Quincy Wright had said that “intervention may be diplomatic as well as military. A diplomatic communication of pre-emptory or threatening tone, implying possible use of military or other coercive measures may constitute intervention”.

…the way forward to actual relief and mitigation of the sufferings of people, lies only in an effective ‘intervention’ in Balochistan under the auspices of UN. Balochistan is too serious a problem to be managed through political rhetoric alone.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s reference to the instances of violation of human rights in Balochistan or thanking them for using kind words for him qualifies to be an act of ‘diplomatic intervention’ only as per the above definition.

At this time, the human right violations and genocide in Balochistan have reached such a scale of an enormity as could (should) shake up the collective conscience of the international community. Prime Minister Modi’s reference to Balochistan in his Independence Day speechtriggered an avalanche of angry reactions from Pakistani and Chinese establishment and media but, nevertheless, it also brought up this issue on international agenda and to that extent this diplomatic adventurism appears to be on target. However, the way forward to actual relief and mitigation of the sufferings of people, lies only in an effective ‘intervention’ in Balochistan under the auspices of UN. Balochistan is too serious a problem to be managed through political rhetoric alone.

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Offended By Jain Monk’s Nudity? High Time You Broke Free Of Victorian Moral Values

Offended By Jain Monks Nudity

On 26 August, Jain monk Tarun Sagar addressed the Haryana assembly. The Digambar monk (Digambars reject clothing) talked about many issues, ranging from female foeticide to Pakistan. But many intellectuals and media persons found it ridiculous that a nude monk was given such a platform to talk about the country’s problems.

This is not the first time that the nudity of a Jain monk has been ridiculed in the public discourse of this country. In 2006, the picture of the then president Dr APJ Abdul Kalam, bowing before the naked Jain monk, went viral. Then, it was mostly through email even as some magazines ridiculed Indian society—a rocket scientist bowing before a naked obscurantist?

That happens only in India, they said, and laughed.

Jains: Always in mainstream of India’s consciousness

Long ago, puritan Jain monks were ridiculed for their perceived obsession with non-violence that often drove them to extreme penances. During the Saivite revival, the seventh century saint Thiru Gnana Sambandar mocked what he considered to be the Jain negation of life and their dry, intellectual arguments.

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Why and How India Must Support Balochistan

Why and How India Must

By invoking Balochistan, POJK and Gilgit-Baltistan from the ramparts of historic Red Fort during his Independence Day speech, PM Modi has signalled a titanic shift in India’s foreign policy.

What is common between Balochistan, POJK and Gilgit-Baltistan? All three regions are victim of gross human right violations and economic deprivation through brutal use of military power by Pakistan.

India is now asserting its role not only as a regional power but also as an emerging world power. It is a strategic move against Pakistan which has not only launched a proxy war against India backed by jihadi terror but also has been blatantly interfering in our domestic affairs ignoring the spirit of Shimla Agreement.

What is common between Balochistan, POJK and Gilgit-Baltistan? All three regions are victim of gross human right violations and economic deprivation through brutal use of military power by Pakistan. Kalat (which includes most of modern Balochistan) and J&K were both princely states that decided not to join either India or Pakistan when the British announced partition of India under the Independence of India Act 1947. Both the princely states signed a Standstill Agreement with Dominion of Pakistan and were victim of Pakistan’s treachery.

Pakistan invaded J&K in October 1947 as a consequence of which the Maharaja acceded to India on 27 October 1947 paving way for arrival of Indian forces in the state to contest the Pakistani invasion.

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Danger In North East: Christian Terror on one side, Islamist on the other

Danger In North East

The terrorists entered the market and started firing indiscriminately, and before anyone could know, dead bodies were scattered around and cries of carnage filled the air.

That would describe what happened in the Kokrajhar market attack on 5 August in Assam, or any recent Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS)-style lone-gunman operation. However, it also draws similarities with the massacre carried out by the National Liberation Front of Tripura (NLFT) at the Singicherra Bazaar in Tripura in 2002. NLFT – a Christian secessionist outfit had issued diktats against the celebration of Makar Sankranthi – the pan-India harvest festival. To punish those who dared to celebrate, NLFT terrorists entered the Singicherra market and shot dead 16 villagers. (16 shot dead by NLFT in Tripura – PTI, 13 January, 2002)

The Kokrajhar attack shows the revival of the old tactics by the North-Eastern secessionist outfits. It may also be indicating some new dynamics in the present changed political milieu of Assam. And it needs serious attention.

In the North-Eastern states, there is a pattern to secessionist terrorism. These terror forces are animated by the dangerously-flawed Marxist theory of linguistic racism. Every tribal language subgroup has been made to consider itself a separate ‘subjugated nation’ and wants to violently eliminate the ‘oppressing nation’. Missionary forces play no small role in creating this violent ethnic divide.

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India’s Home Minister in Pakistan: Take Action Against Terrorists and Countries That Support Them

Indias home minister in pakistan

Ever since the formation of SAARC in 1985, Indo-Pak relations have always overshadowed various other important regional issues. Pakistan’s obsession of Kashmir and its aggressive stance on that matter make her raise it on all international forums including SAARC. Thus derailing the very basic agenda of regional cooperation into a bilateral slug fest between the two nuclear armed nations.

India’s Home Minister, Mr Rajnath Singh was in Pakistan, attending the annual SAARC Home / Interior Ministers’ meet at Islamabad on Aug 04, 2016.

Never ever in the history of Indo-Pak relations, an Indian minister has so unequivocally blamed Pakistan for region’s instability on its very own soil.

In his speech, the Indian Home minister lashed out at Pakistan without naming her, for her support of terrorism, eulogising the terrorists and harbouring them.

Never ever in the history of Indo-Pak relations, an Indian minister has so unequivocally blamed Pakistan for region’s instability on its very own soil. He highlighted Pakistan’s role in terrorist attacks stretching in time and space from Kabul to Dhaka.He emphasised the urgency to punish those who perpetrated attacks on Mumbai and Pathankot.

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