Thu06222017

Last updateTue, 13 Jun 2017 9am

The Cartel’s ‘Theories’

The Cartels Theories

Indian postcolonialists (who started with good intentions). are like outsourced coolies who sustain and enhance the theory and the politics of the Western Knowledge Factory. In other words, they are working for the cartel.  Article #8 in the continuing dialogue.

I had planned a second part to my earlier article (The Peer-Review Cartel) to explore the cartel issue in further depth. But given the misunderstandings reflected in Vijay’s response (Po-Mo, Neo-Lib…And Shoddiness)  I shall restrict this piece (and its companion) to responding to it.

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A Business Model Of Religion - 1

A Business Model Of Religion - 1

Why a Business Model for Religion:

The world today owes its prosperity to the proper functioning of a free market system. This includes 

  • The regulatory framework for a level playing field.
  • The balancing of the suppliers' freedom with the rights of consumers and society.
  • The accountability of the players to a variety of independent authorities.

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Dharma Is Not The Same As Religion

DharmaNotReligion

The word "dharma" has multiple meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Monier-Williams' Sanskrit-English Dictionary lists several, including: conduct, duty, right, justice, virtue, morality, religion, religious merit, good work according to a right or rule, etc. Many other meanings have been suggested, such as law or "torah" (in the Judaic sense), "logos" (Greek), "way" (Christian) and even 'tao" (Chinese). None of these is entirely accurate and none conveys the full force of the term in Sanskrit. Dharma has no equivalent in the Western lexicon.

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The Hijacking of Wharton

The Hijacking of Wharton

I have repeatedly criticized Western academic biases toward India in humanities departments. In contrast, I consider business schools less ideologically motivated, focused instead on imparting business skills. However, the recent decision by Wharton to un-invite Narendra Modi to the Wharton India Economic Forum shows that the ideals, ethics and independence of Wharton Business School are getting hijacked.

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Tibetan Uprising Day Reminds Us

Tibetan Uprising Day Reminds Us

More than a half century ago, on March 10th, 1959, Tibetans revolted against the Chinese military occupation of Tibet that began in 1951. The revolt ended badly for the Tibetans who suffered from a brutal Chinese crackdown. This caused the Dalai Lama, with the help of the CIA, to flee with his supporters to India. On March 31, 1959, after a grueling 15-day journey across the Himalayas on foot, the Dalai Lama escaped from the Chinese and crossed over to India along with 80,000 Tibetans. Ever since then, March 10th has been commemorated as Tibetan Uprising Day with worldwide protest marches to mobilize support for the Tibetan cause.

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Response to the Postmodernist charge of “Essentialism”

Response to the Postmodernist Charge of Essentialism

My book’s emphasis on difference is mainly about differences in axioms, truth-claims and philosophies. The purpose is to demonstrate that all truth-claims are not the same, and the intent is not to establish the superiority or inferiority of any. Some post-modernists do find all truth-claims to be essentialism, including all scientific claims; however, that is such an extreme view that I shall not bother to address it. My response here is to another kind of charge of essentialism – i.e. the use of terms like West, India, Dharma, Christian.

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Gandhi: Quintessentially Different and Non-Digestible

Gandhi Quintessentially Different and Non-Digestible

My book brings to the foreground some fundamental differences between Indian and Western civilizations, and explored at length the spiritual, metaphysical, philosophical and historical basis for such differences. I argue, that to gloss over these differences, reveals a dismal lack of civilizational self-awareness and wishful thinking on the part of Westerners, and low self-esteem by Indians resulting in part of an education system that seems to be still fulfilling the mandates of colonial educators.

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